Tuesday, 12 January 2016

HC Candidate Profile: Teryl Austin

TERYL AUSTIN




Age: 50

Place of Birth: Sharon, Pennsylvania

First Coached in the NFL in 2003

NFL Coaching Tree: Mike Holmgren, Ken Whisenhunt, John Harbaugh, Jim Caldwell

NFL Record: N/A (no head coaching experience)

Summary - Austin is a popular candidate around the league, and has been for a couple of seasons now. No, it's not just to satisfy the Rooney Rule, Austin has a legitimate shot at landing a job this off-season. He's helped coach two teams to the Super Bowl - Seattle in '06 and Arizona in '09 - in both instances as defensive backs coach (not an easy position to have success with as Titans fans have seen this season). More recently at Detroit, he has been able to put together competent units. In 2015/16 Detroit ranked around the middle of the league - depending on measurement - in defense, which may not sound impressive, but after the atrocious start to the season it is a pretty solid accomplishment to have turned that unit around to such a great extent. The question of Austin's candidacy lies not within his defensive competency, but with who he would choose to be his offensive coordinator should he land a top job.

Pros - High competency in defense, especially the defensive back position. Seems to have the demeanor of a Head Coach. Is a player's coach but is also well-respect by all accounts. Is a hot-candidate. Runs an effective 4-3 system with lots of nickel usage, something a section of Titans fans have been clamoring for. Has been consistent with every team he has been with. Has always fielded good units in areas that he coached. Will likely be able to work well in traditional GM/HC separation of responsibilities.

Cons - No previous head coaching experience. Questions over his contacts within the game and if he could hire a good enough offensive coordinator or a quality staff as a whole. A rookie coach at 50 years old, is it too late? Only just recently been a defensive coordinator at the NFL level, questions over whether it's too quick a transition to be hired as a head coach. Mariota is the most important asset to the Titans, does he have a plan for him and the offensive knowledge to find someone to cater to MM and help him reach his full potential?

Conclusion - Teryl Austin isn't a perfect candidate, but I'm interested as long as he can effectively answer some key questions; What are your plans for Marcus? Can you build a good enough staff, particularly at offensive coordinator? Can you handle the extra responsibilities of being an NFL Head Coach? If he can effectively answer those questions then he'd be a finalist for me. He's considered the 'hot' rookie HC candidate for a reason and there's no reason to believe that he is just a token Rooney Rule interview. We'll see Titans fans, but don't rule out Austin just yet.

Saturday, 9 January 2016

THE_TITAN's 2016 NFL Draft RB Rankings

1. Ezekiel Elliott, RB, Ohio State Buckeyes - Elliott is the most explosive and best all-round running back in this draft class. He possesses long speed, power, good vision and a burst through the hole. There is really very little to dislike about him as a prospect. He occasionally could be more explosive when running underneath passing routes, but when thrown to him he demonstrates good hands when catching the ball. The only real 'weakness' that Elliott has is in pass protection where he needs to improve against the bull rush, but even in this category he is above average. Draft Ranking: Top 10

Ezekiel Elliott will make coaches salivate in the 2016 Draft.

2. Derrick Henry, RB, Alabama Crimson Tide - Henry is a productive 'thumper', plain and simple. One of the most productive running backs in SEC history, the Heisman winner will have a lot of suitors in the draft. He's a powerful between the tackles runner that is able to wear teams out with his size, strength and powerful strides. On multiple occasions he was able to run an inordinate amount of times in one game that by the fourth quarter the defensive opposition couldn't handle him. He can also be relied on in pass protection. Concerns start to appear when you notice Henry's lack of burst, he's not a home run hitter and he does rely on his offensive line quite a bit on big games. While his vision is excellent, his feet aren't always able to keep up with his eyes. There are questions as to whether or not he can have significant production at the pro level behind a mediocre offensive line. 'Tread on the tires' should also be cause for concern, Henry ran the ball 566 times in college. Overall, though, Henry is a premier prospect. He's not going to catch many balls or hit many home runs but he will wear defenses out at the next level. Draft Ranking: 1st Round-2nd Round

3. Paul Perkins, RB, UCLA Bruins - Perkins is a prospect that seems to be going under the radar in many draft circles. I have no idea why that is the case, he has been the most productive runner in the PAC-12 for quite some time now. Perkins is not a shifty back, but if you let him hit the hole and power through he will get your team a lot of yards. He has good vision, a nice frame and is a violent runner. Also looks decent in pass protection and is willing to get physical with his pass routes and in chipping opposing players. His hands are good enough to make him a three-down-back. The concern with Perkins is that he doesn't come from a pro-style system. He's also not a particularly special athlete despite his production. His lean frame might lead to some holes in his pass protection, that we have yet to see, be exposed. All in all, he is a starting back for someone, probably more likely in year two than in his rookie season. Draft Ranking: 2nd Round

4. Devontae Booker, RB, Utah Utes - Booker is a short, thick, compact and powerful workhorse back. He was a decisive and reliable runner for Utah. His lack of height enables him to get a low center of gravity, making him harder to tackle and pick out in traffic. He's a single-decision, downhill runner that will not make many plays on the edge but will pick up plenty of four yard and five yard gains through the middle. He's also a three-down-back with his ability to catch underneath passes. Booker's draft stock takes a hit with his lack of home-run speed and his lack of lateral quickness. He's seen a lot of action at Utah so teams will be concerned about whether there is too much tread on the tires. He's also a work-in-progress as a pass protector. Draft Ranking: 3rd Round

Booker is a solid prospect but has a limited ceiling. 

5. Alex Collins, RB, Arkansas Razorbacks - Collins is a back that I only became aware of as the past season wore on and I watched more SEC football. Every time I caught Arkansas I thought to myself  "Who is this guy? I like him." and, after finally scouting him, my initial eyeball assessment looks to be right. He has a very thick frame and an explosive burst through the hole. His vision is very good in my opinion and he is also able to make people miss in the open field despite a lack of home-run speed. Collins is a physical runner with good production that projects to come into the NFL and challenge for a starting spot. Concerns lie with Collins' low ceiling. He is not much of a receiver which limits his third-down viability. Many have compared Collins' game to Isaiah Crowell and I would say that is a fair assessment but I think Collins will be a 1,000 yard runner at the next level (something which Crowell has yet to achieve). Draft Ranking: 3rd Round-4th Round

Tape References:

Elliot-
vs Oregon
vs Michigan
vs Virginia Tech
vs Wisconsin

Henry-
vs Georgia
vs Florida
vs Ole Miss
vs Wisconsin

Perkins-
vs Virginia
vs UNLV

Booker-
vs UCLA
vs Washington State

Collins-
vs Samford
vs Texas A&M
vs Texas Tech

HC Candidate Profle: Doug Marrone

DOUG MARRONE





Age: 51

Place of Birth: Bronx, New York

First coached in the NFL in 2002

NFL coaching tree: Herm Edwards, Sean Payton, Gus Bradley

NFL record: 15-17 (.469) with the Buffalo Bills

Summary - Marrone was hired as the Bill's Head Coach in 2013 after an impressive tenure as the head coach of Syracuse in the NCAA. His presence was quickly felt within the franchise, in his second season he led the Bills to their first winning record in over a decade. He surprisingly decided to enact his opt-out clause after his second season to leave the Bills. Many thought this decision was motivated by his annoyance with personnel decisions and alienation from the front office in general. Over his career Marrone has mainly focused on the offensive line and tight ends and, as such, he favours power football.

Pros - As mentioned above, Marrone has had moderate to good success in his head coaching career. He has been said to have a good rapport with veteran players throughout his career. Many analysts consider Marrone a top head coaching candidate; Charlie Casserly went as far to say "Doug deserves to be a head coach in the NFL and I'd hire him in a minute". Marrone's background with the offensive line is sure to intrigue the Titans who have had issues at the position for a number of seasons.

Cons - Has never been a coach of a 'top' team. Questions over whether he can build a consistent playoff contender. His exit from Buffalo will leave a sour taste in the mouth and should dissuade potential suitors. There are questions over his patience with young players. Marcell Dareus criticised Marrone when stating "Things were tense. He was always anal and cared about stupid little things, micro-managed us". His ability to separate himself from front office and head coach duties is questionable. The Titans are looking for a 'traditional' seperation of power, Marrone will have to control his emotions if the front office make personnel decisions he disagrees with. Has now left two teams without significant warning leaving them in poor positions to replace him. Former players and coaching colleagues have criticized Marrone. Doesn't seem like a media-friendly figure.

Conclusion - No thank you. Marrone is an interesting candidate. He's the type of strong personality that I think would be more of a fit in the New York or Philadelphia markets. But when it comes down to it there are just too many concerns listed in the 'Cons' bracket to be comfortable with the hire. The Titans are a young team and, while they need direction, they also need a coach that players can connect to and universally respect. I don't think Marrone is that guy.




Friday, 8 January 2016

Early Retirements in the NFL, Should we be Worried?

The news this week that Calvin 'Megatron' Johnson was considering retirement sent shock waves around the NFL. But should we be so shocked? Early retirements have become more commonplace in the NFL as players are becoming more aware about the medical dangers involved with playing the game. Many fans will question the players 'love of the game' or the loss of potential earnings involved with such a lucrative sport. But the dangers of playing professional football are now become well understood. The release of recent blockbuster movie 'Concussion' will only make the general public and NFL players more cognizant of the potential impact that a life playing football can have on the body.The lucrative nature of the sport may also lead some players to early retirement, as well as the toxic effects of the media spotlight on individuals and families.

Players first started becoming truly aware of the extent to which football, and playing contact sports in general ,affects the human brain in 2002. The discovery of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) by Dr. Bennet Omalu finally gave a name to the disease that had affected so many professional athletes. The disease is defined as a "progressive degenerative disease found in people with a history of repetitive brain trauma". From the definition itself, it's clear to see how this disease is inextricably linked to the sport of American football. The NFL in particular is defined by it's big hits, high speed collisions and short bursts of extreme contact. While I can't be sure that this element is involved in Megatron's exit motivations, it has led to prominent retirements from the NFL.

Chris Borland, formerly of the San Francisco 49ers, was a recent player to retire whom cited medical concerns as the primary reason for his decision. In an interview with ESPN.com Borland stated "I just honestly want to do what's best for my health... From what I've researched and what I've experienced, I don't think it's worth the risk". There is no doubt that other players will come to the same conclusion as Borland over the coming years if the status quo prevails in safety procedures and a lack of a cure for CTE remains. While the NFL should be concerned by this, they can't change the potential outcomes without making tough decisions about the way the sport is played and that may be why they are so reluctant to move away from the status quo.


Image result for calvin johnson
Not so happy anymore? Megatron is considering early retirement.

However, it's not just medical concerns that are motivating early retirements. The lucrative nature of the business and the focused spotlight on the individual are also motivations for retirement. This element might have more to do with Megatron's recent thoughts about his future. Over his career Megatron has signed contracts worth over $100 million in guaranteed money. There is literally no financial incentive for him to consider playing beyond greed or the hunger for an even more lavish lifestyle. The sum of money he has earned would make him financially secure for several lifetimes at the very least. Playing football in Detroit, with limited to no success, would not be particularly enticing to many with that much money in the bank. It's possible that the daily rigors of NFL life and the stress on Megatron's body has led him to think that it's just not worth it any more. It's hard to argue the opposite. The lucrative nature of the NFL is maybe it's own enemy in this regard. Once a player makes a certain amount of money there is literally no reason to play beyond cementing a legacy, winning a championship or for the love of the game. It's just a fact that not every professional player will have those motivations.

Moreover, the retirement of Jake Locker - once a member of my beloved Titans - may be linked to the financial factor coupled with the desire for a 'normal' family life. The spotlight on NFL players can certainly be unbearable for particular individuals, especially quarterbacks, where the focus is even more concentrated. Locker talked about not having "the burning desire necessary to play the game for a living" as well as his hopes to spend more time with his family. You can not besmirch the man for his decision. Many of us would've made the same choice; a couple of million in the bank and just sit back and have fun with your family for the rest of your life. Maybe this area of early retirements will lead NFL scouting departments to place more value on a prospect's "love for the game" so that they're not investing in a person that will bolt after one contract.

Bringing this information together it's easy to be concerned about early retirements becoming more commonplace in the NFL. Whether it be for medical, financial or person reasons, we can not blame this phenomenon on the players. The NFL's lack of a substantial plan to combat CTE is clearly something that can be changed if a commissioner comes a long that is willing to make tough decisions to save the future of the sport - removing or significantly altering helmets seems to be an option coming to the fore recently. If the NFL opts to not make these hard choices then the future of the sport could be affected, with less parents willing to let their children play American Football, instead opting for 'softer' sports like basketball, baseball or soccer. In terms of financial and personal factors, the NFL is merely an victim of its own success here and there is little they could do to combat these retirements. But, in the end, as fans we should not be worried because there will always be individuals willing to step up and perform, who love the sport and are willing to put their bodies on the line for their team, their fans and their legacy.

NFL Wild Card Week Predictions

AFC

Kansas City @ Houston Texans -

Houston is a pass-rushing force with JJ Watt and Whitney Mercilus. They also possess one of the best wide receivers in the league in DeAndre Hopkins. Those players will be relied on to achieve a victory for the Texans. Hoyer is a question mark at the QB positions and the running game is not convincing. They'll need someone to have a special outing to beat the KC defense.

Kansas City has pushed on later in the season to be one of the under-the-radar Super Bowl picks. Alex Smith is always solid-not-spectacular at the QB position and his weapons of Maclin and Kelce have been a revelation. They haven't missed a beat at RB which Charles injured. KC's defense is also very well rounded, Peters is a strong candidate for DROY, Houston is a pass rushing nightmare and Poe is one of the most stout Nose Tackles in the league. They will look to rely on their smash-mouthed running game and getting the ball out of Smith's hands quickly to get the victory.

My Pick: Kansas City Chiefs

Pittsburgh Steelers @ Cincinnati Bengals

The Bengals are one of the most well-rounded teams in the league. Their defense is strong from top to bottom with strong playmakers on all levels. Atkins, Rey, Burfict and Kirkpatrick all had strong seasons among others and they will be relied on to contain and explosive Pittsburgh offense. The question mark for the Bengals will again come on offense. Their offensive line is strong and their running game as a good one-two punch with Hill and Bernard. But Dalton is injured so AJ McCarron will have to come in and beat one of the more consistent playoff performers in NFL history, it will be no easy task.

Pittsburgh sneak into the playoffs on the back of an explosive season on offense. The Roethlisberger-Brown combination is probably the most explosive in the league and any team will struggle to contain it. Even if they do, they'll have other weapons like Bryant and the underrated Wheaton. Pittsburgh;s issue will be on defense where I believe they have below-par personnel, particularly in the secondary. Antwon Blake will likely be targeted by the Bengals and if he's isolated with AJ Green then that's a no-win situation for the Steelers. The Steelers do still have some explosive guys on their 'D' though, Shazier is my personal favourite.

My Pick: Pittsburgh Steelers

NFC

Green Bay Packers  @ Washington Redskins

Washington has probably been the most surprising team in the league for me. Like it or not, Cousins has been fantastic for them this season. He doesn't have elite tools but he seems to be performing, especially in clutch situations. The Redskins offensive line deserve a lot of credit for the offensive performance this season while they haven't been spectacular they've been solid enough, Trent Williams is truly elite. The Redskins also have solid-not-spectacular personnel on the defense. They are one of those teams that do not have a lot of 'star power' but will give every team in the league a game.

The Green Bay Packers have been a massive disappointment this season. Rodgers has not been protected all season and the loss of wide receiver Jordy Nelson has affected the entire receiving corps. Cobb doesn't look like an effective weapon at WR1. Rodgers (the tight end) is an underrated weapon and the Redskins would be wise to game plan for him as he's had breakout games this season. On defense the Packers are decent, they still have some really good players, Clay Matthews is always dangerous and I've been a fan of Datone Jones since his college days. They also have a pair of nice young safeties.

My Pick: Washington Redskins

Seattle Seahawks @ Minnesota Vikings

The Seahawks have been a revelation in a latter half of the season. Russell Wilson has calmed down in the pocket and, as a result, has had some mammoth performances. Watch out for Doug Baldwin, he's had a very good season and can still be classified as under-the-radar. Lynch will look to come back into the team in the post-season and reclaim his 'beast mode' season. What more is there to say about the Seattle defense other than "elite"? I mean they are elite from top to bottom at all positions. The top scoring defense in the NFL once again. Surprise? Nah. Update: Lynch is ruled out of the game. While this makes it a closer affair, I'm sticking with me Seahawks pick.

Mike Zimmer has transformed the Vikings from perennially mediocre to a legitimate contender and a solid franchise. Bridgewater has come on leaps and bounds but you still have to be concerned about how much he is getting hit, Kalil ain't doing him no favours out there! He's also not the most athletic guy, but let him rely on the run game and he'll complete enough passes for you to move down the field efficiently. Diggs has been a surprise rookie. Watch for the Vikings to rely on their All-Pro back AP, it usually works. On defense, Zimmer has solidified a once leaky unit. They are solid from top to bottom with their MVP being Linval Joseph who's been nothing short of a revelation. They'll rely on Joseph to stop Lynch.

My Pick: Seattle Seahawks


I very rarely go four for four so I wouldn't bet on my predictions if I were you! Once thing that I am certain of though is that this is going to be an exciting week of Wild Card games. The elite teams in the NFL are on show and I would bet one of the winners is bound to go to the Super Bowl.


THE_TITAN's 2016 NFL Draft WR Rankings

1. Laquon Treadwell, WE, Ole Miss Rebels - Treadwell is the premier wide receiver in this draft. Despite his injury issues he has exhibited elite catching ability for the Rebels. He is a solid route runner and has great hands but his top speed is a concern as sometimes he struggles to get separation from the defensive back. An underrated aspect of his game is his blocking, he has great technique and is really strong in the upper body area which will enable him to extend plays. He has great run after the catch ability and should be the go-to receiver in contested situations. Treadwell will have to get more disciplined and cut penalties out of his game, his injuries will also be an area of concern for NFL team's medical staffs. But there is no doubt that Treadwell will be coveted in May. Draft Ranking: Top 10

Treadwell is a QB's dream. 
2. Corey Coleman, WR, Baylor Bears - Coleman comes from a prolific Art Briles offense that has produced a number of NFL-caliber wide receivers. He might just be the best to ever come out of that system. Coleman possesses great hands but his greatest skill is his ability to stretch the field. His deep speed would create separation against most NFL defensive backs. His ability to run after the catch might be second to none in this draft. He possesses an extra gear and rare speed is something that teams have always coveted at the next level. The main area of concern for Coleman is that he has come from a spread system, meaning he has not been asked to run an NFL route tree and make the contested catches over the middle that he'd be asked to do at the next level. Teams must be confident in Coleman's ability to translate his skills to a pro-style offense, but if he can he'd be one of the best new additions to the pro game. Draft Ranking: Top 20


3. Will Fuller, WR, Notre Dame Fighting Irish - Fuller is a prospect that I have only recently started scouting and I was surprised at how good he looked. He is able to run every route an NFL team will ask him to run and has a knack of coming up with catches in clutch situations. He has a good athletic pedigree, although you would like him to be a couple of inches taller. Defenders couldn't cover him and ended up either giving up holding or PI penalties to prevent Fuller from making plays. Several areas for improvement for Fuller would include catching the ball with his hands all the time instead of his occasional tendency to body catch and also he needs to eliminate some drops from his game. Draft Ranking: Top 25

Fuller will get a lot of attention when the 2016 Draft comes around. A surprising prospect. 
4. Tyler Boyd, WR, Pittsburgh Panthers - Boyd is one of the most exciting athletes in the draft. His lighting speed will be an asset for teams on offense and special teams. He was a top recruit coming into Pitt and has impressed during his time there with mediocre QB play. He is a very versatile player with the ability to line up at all receiver positions and even take pitches to take advantage of his speed on the edge. Boyd has solid hands, with the ability to make contested catches and has also shown the ability to get separation from defensive backs with ease. Areas of concern for Boyd would be his thin frame that may end up being prone to injury at the next level. He has also not been asked to run many deep routes at Pitt and scouts will be looking for his ability to do that at the next level. Character concerns may also put some teams off taking Boyd early. Draft Ranking: 2nd Round

5. Michael Thomas, WR, Ohio State Buckeyes - Thomas is a receiver that is well known but has probably been underutilized during his time at Ohio State. He has the ideal frame to be an NFL wide receiver and has exhibited exceptional route-running ability from short, medium to deep range passing routes. As well as this, he is great at completing contested catches and high pointing the football.Thomas isn't the most explosive athlete and his production does not match up to his ability as a pass catcher, which will be areas of concern for teams. Due to this lack of explosiveness he may end up being a better WR2 than WR1. Draft Ranking: 2nd Round

Honourable Mentions:

Pharoh Cooper, WR, South Carolina Gamecocks
Josh Doctson, WR, TCU Horned Frogs

Tape references:

Treadwell -
vs Vanderbilt
vs Auburn
vs Florida
vs LSU
vs Boise St.
vs Alabama

Coleman -
vs Rice
vs West Virginia
vs Kansas
vs Michigan St.
vs Oklahoma

Fuller -
vs Florida St
vs Texas
vs USC

Boyd -
vs North Carolina
vs Iowa 2015
vs Miami
vs Iowa 2014

Thomas -
vs Virginia Tech
vs Michigan
vs Michigan St

THE_TITAN's 2016 NFL Draft OT Rankings

This is the first of what I hope to be a fruitful series of player rankings for the upcoming 2016 NFL Draft. Obviously Combine testing and further information - e.g. character concerns, felonies committed after this date, injuries incurred - will not be taken into account with these rankings.

The first of the series is a position of interest for the Titans, Offensive Tackle:

1. Ronnie Stanley, OT, Notre Dame Fighting Irish - Stanley might be a surprise number one selection here for many but I'll explain why I have him ranked here. Firstly, I see Stanley as the best pure pass protector in the draft. He has rare length and astonishing footwork for a man of his size which render speed rushers ineffective. Stanley also gets square well and has thick hips that make it hard to get pushed back from his base which nullifies the effectiveness of the bull rush. One area for improvement for Stanley is that in the run blocking game he shouldn't just rely on pure power and athleticism to get the job done. On a couple of occasions this has led to poor technique in run blocking and missed opportunities to secure blocks in the open field. Despite this he is still a premier run blocker in this draft. Any team would be lucky to have Stanley on their roster. Draft Ranking: Top 5

Stanley is my top rated OT for 2016.


2. Laremy Tunsil, OT, Ole Miss Rebels - Tunsil is what teams look for in a prototypical left tackle. He has the size, the foot speed, the thickness and the ability to be effective in pass protection and run blocking. The fact that he is not the top ranked OT in my mind should not be too much of a black mark on his work. Tunsil has certainly shown he can be one of the most consistent players in college football when healthy. I believe he is the best run blocker in this draft class, he consistently gets on blocks and has perfect technique. He doesn't just rely on pure athleticism to get the job done in this area. His one area for improvement would be pass blocking where, despite being great, he has had some struggles vs. speed rushers. His game against Auburn is an example of this, Carl Lawson gave Tunsil some concerns. A broken leg sustained in 2014 might also perturb scouts. But despite those concerns, there's no doubt that Tunsil possesses elite offensive tackle traits and will be among the first players taken in the draft. Draft Ranking: Top 5

3. Taylor Decker, OT, Ohio State Buckeyes - Decker has been a prolific starter on one of the most successful teams in college football as of late. His main strength is with his run blocking where he's been able to help one of the best running backs in the country, 'Zeke' Elliott, get national attention. He's nasty in his run blocking, able to drive men back and gets good leverage on his opponent. He also possesses a nice frame and good length which leads to him being a solid pass protector. He does have some issues with speed rushers and is not the most polished athlete in the world but he will be a starter at tackle for someone in the 2016-17 NFL season. Draft Ranking: Top 20

4. Jason Spriggs, OT, Indiana Hoosiers - Spriggs is the classic small-school offensive lineman that makes a big impact at the pro level. He has prototypical NFL size and his speed and athleticism particularly impress when you watch him in Indiana's up tempo offense. His ability to pass protect by using his superior athleticism is something which you would look to transfer into the NFL as long as he can get some pro coaching to refine his technique. He's a solid, not special, run blocker but his build and ability make him a fit at either right or left tackle. The main area of concern for Spriggs is that he is coming from a spread offense and has only faced small school opponents. The task for him is to translate his play against stronger opposition in the NFL. Draft Ranking: 1st Round

Spriggs is a small school guy that will turn heads.

5. Germain Ifedi, OT, Texas A&M Aggies - Ifedi is the classic high risk, high reward player. He has pretty special athleticism and a huge wing span. He has also showcased solid technique practicing at both tackle positions for the Aggies. The concern for Ifedi will be refinement in his game and the ability to become a reliable starter. He also seems to have a tendency to hold on to pass rushers when his technique fails. But he will get early attention from front offices because of rare athletic traits that he possesses for the position. I think it's possible he goes as even as high as the middle-late part of the first round due to the lack of consensus and depth beyond the top two offensive tackle prospects. Draft Ranking: Late 1st - Early 2nd Round

Tape References:

Stanley -
vs Syracuse
vs USC
vs Texas

Tunsil -
vs Boise St
vs Auburn
vs Alabama
vs Mississippi St
vs Oklahoma St
vs TCU

Decker -
vs Michigan St
vs Virginia Tech
vs Michigan
vs Alabama

Spriggs -
vs Southern Illinois
vs Ohio St
vs Rutgers

Ifedi -
vs Alabama